1903 Théâtre Capitole de Québec

1903 Théâtre Capitole de Québec

 

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copper roof

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1893 Château Frontenac

1893 Château Frontenac

 

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advanced Lego project

 

 

Parliament

1886 Hôtel du Parlement (Parliament of Quebec)

 

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x

 

 

 

 

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Ice floes on the St. Lawrence

 

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1817 Chapelle des Jésuites

 

 

 

 

 

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looking up toward La Promenade des Gouverneurs

 

 

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Basilique-cathédrale Notre-Dame de Québec. Famous as the “engulfed cathedral” and generally unable to be used until late July, when most of the snow has melted.

 

 

 

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Ok, baker’s dozen. What a beautiful city.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

architecture, Canada, photography, Quebec, travel, Uncategorized, Winter

One Dozen Rooftops. Ville de Québec, Canada

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6 thoughts on “One Dozen Rooftops. Ville de Québec, Canada

  1. When I finished scrolling through the photos, I thought, “But he promised us a dozen!” Well, there are twelve, but each in its own way is so inviting that I lost track as I looked. I must say — you have some fine rooftops. Around here, the only thing I can think of that comes even close might be the Philip Johnson-designed building downtown. Well, and some churches. But they’re not nearly so interesting as these.

    I’m really curious about the “engulfed cathedral.” Were you teasing us? I can’t find anything about it being engulfed online, and the fact that it’s centrally located, is the site of a “holy door” and so on makes me wonder if that bit about not being able to be used until July isn’t hyperbole. It’s a gem, that’s for sure. It’s too bad it suffered from multiple fires.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, just teasing. I caught sight of the steeple over a big pile of snow on the city walls, and it looked for a minute like the church was under a snowdrift. There’s a beautiful piece of music by Debussy called “La cathédrale engloutie” about an underwater church, and I guess the correct translation is “submerged” – I don’t speak French, and somehow remembered it being “engulfed”
      I saw a painting of a huge fire in this city, in the old days (1840’s) it seems like every old town has burned down a few times!

      Like

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