Finger Lakes, FLX, Nature, NY, Upstate New York

Rip Van Winkle Chair

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41 thoughts on “Rip Van Winkle Chair

  1. I must admit I’m happy I got a different chair for my office yesterday. On the other hand, when I think how much time I spend here in front of the computer, it’s a wonder I’m not growing moss all over myself. 😀

      • Over the weekend I discovered a dog-eared copy of Washington Irving short stories in a stack of old books in my upstairs and so I’ll read Rip Van Winkle. Btw, on Saturday while I was people-watching in front of a coffee shop of the city’s Queen Anne Hill neighborhood, a fellow unlocked his bicycle and rode off. He was wearing a backpack with a prominent patch featuring the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, the yellow and black threw me off at first…….

  2. Poor Mr. Van Winkle. He clearly was feeling his age when he got up and ripped the other arm from the chair. Even the nails couldn’t keep that from happening — that wood’s been sinking back into the woods for a long time!

  3. That chair is lovely! I once talked my dad into making me a chair out of a tree stump when I was about six years old. I’d been to a “lumberjack” show at an amusement park where men with chainsaws sliced up trees and turned out perfectly formed chairs. I had no idea that another actor just made a chair appear after all of the sawing and cutting. I really thought that people with chainsaws could carve chairs. My dad was up to the challenge though. With just two chainsaw maneuvers, he cut a wedge out of a tree stump so that it kind of looked like a “chair” with a back and a seat. I actually sat in it for a while.

  4. Lovely! I sometimes come across these in the woods around here and am always delighted. Your’s has a nice moss cushion and welcoming plants around it. I’ve been thinking of painting one, with a girl perched in it and a stack of books surrounding her.

      • I’ve been reading that neighboring trees will continue to feed nutrients to the roots of a felled tree, so the seat may last for quite some time. Fascinating, isn’t it? I’ve also read of people who trained branches of neighboring trees to create trellises and rooms and whatnot. Boy, the possibilities~!

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