I went out one mornin’ when the sun didn’t shine

I picked up my shovel and began to whine

I loaded sixteen tons of wet gray snow

And my neighbor said “It’s just started to blow.”

 

You load sixteen tons, what do you get?

It’s another foot deeper and my socks are wet

Saint Peter don’t you call me when there’s all this snow

It’s hellish cold and the wind does blow

 

If you see me comin’, better step aside

Snowblower’s goin’ and we’re goin’ for a ride

Throttle is stickin’ and you’re gonna take a lickin’

If the auger sucks  your foot inside.

 

You load sixteen tons, what do you get?

It’s another foot deeper and my socks are wet

Saint Peter don’t you call me when there’s all this snow

It’s hellish cold and the wind does blow

 

 

Apologies to Merle Travis
Cold War, Frostbite, snow, Socks, Things to Do When Your Water Crystallizes on You, Winter

A little exertion & one ton of exaggeration

Image

25 thoughts on “A little exertion & one ton of exaggeration

    • Haha very good Denzil. And Dylan grew up in Minnesota, I think subzero every night this week where he’s from, he’ll know a thing or two about snow blowin’ in the wind. When he sings “A hard rain’s a-gonna fall” he means hail.

  1. pinklightsabre says:

    Here’s to Hibbing! And this is hysterical though I’m afraid it’s a bit based in truth too, Robert. Happy 22 my friend.

    • Thanks, Peter. I always liked that song, I didn’t know until today that Tennessee Ernie Ford didn’t write it, it was Merle Travis, singing about the same place as John Prine’s “Paradise,” also a great song. Muhlenburg County, Kentucky

  2. Tennessee Ernie Ford! Ah yes. Up at home there are many who are shoveling and blowing and plowing more 16 tons today. Clever writing Robert and very timely. (ps We are in Florida at the moment so no snow for us here)

  3. What a great parody. Like others, I had no idea that Tennessee Ernie didn’t write this song, but I had no trouble at all putting the tune together with your words.

    Of course, when I was loading my own tons of snow, there weren’t any snowblowers. Honestly, I didn’t think they’d been invented yet, but I just learned that Arthur Sicard, a Montreal native, invented the first modern snow blower in 1925. They didn’t become commercially available or popular until the price dropped below $200 in the 1950s. As convenient as they are, there’s just nothing like that scraping sound when metal meets a concrete drive!

Leave a Reply to Mick Canning Cancel reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s