Colonial History, Dental, George Washington, Public Art, Sculpture, statue, United States

Stumping for President

 

I want to achieve two goals with this post.

First.

Inaugurate a new series “Learning History By Looking At Statues, Before They’re All Taken Down”.

Second.

I don’t want my kid sister to feel badly about not having a driver’s license.

 

 

Dear Sis –

George Washington was a great man.

He fought the French, he fought the English, he fought the Hessians, and he fought the Whiskey Rebellion.

And despite all that, he isn’t seen as a hostile guy, everybody thinks he’s a great guy.

But.

Like many otherwise nice, intelligent people…

He.  Could.  Not.  Parallel.  Park.

Look at this statue.  This happened all the time.

Stuck  on  a  stump.

Because he just couldn’t parallel park.

“Martha?  Can you give me a lift?  There’s something the matter with this horse again.”

And did he give up?  I do not think so.

 

 

What is carved on the base of this statue?  A quotation from the Marquis de Lafayette:

Il est un conducteur terrible.     Mais il est toujours un grand homme”

“He is a terrible driver, but still, a great man.”

Washington was a lesson in perseverance, and overcoming all obstacles in your path.  Except granite curbs.  And light poles.  Stray shopping carts, too.

 

 

 

Now, here he’s crossing the Delaware.

Why would you do that in a little boat, standing up, when the river’s full of ice?

Because you cannot get your horse to go around the safety cones, on the bridge to New Jersey.

So you don’t give up, you take the ferry.

You just have to keep trying.  And re-taking the driving test.  I will give you driving lessons over the holidays.

But not with my car.

 

 

Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

OK I’ve enjoyed posting some photos for Halloween.

If you’re a “regular viewer”, thank you for indulging me, and I promise to simulate maturity for the rest of the year.

Probably posting a bit less for a while, my one-man PR campaign for Upstate New York will be on hold – –

Moving to Boston for six months, perhaps longer, starting a new job, which I expect will require total focus.

New job, new town.  Remembering lots of new names, figuring out the commute, where to get groceries.

There’s a Whole Foods across the street, expensive, and I cannot bring myself to disturb the produce displays,

it would be like vandalizing an art installation.

New language, too – – what is “scrod” and is that the same thing as “wicked pissah,” etc.

I’m looking forward to all the great museums, musical venues, and galleries.

Already learned that the Boston streets are an ironic art installation all their own, designed by M.C. Escher.

But I will, of course, continue to read everyone else’s posts, could not get by without that!  🙂

 

 

Halloween, photography

trick or treat, please go ’round to the back door

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Autumn, Finger Lakes, FLX, Halloween, photography, Upstate New York

Pictures of Upstate New York. October. A walk in the woods on All Hallows’ Eve.

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Autumn, Halloween, Nature, photography

the twisted tree

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Finger Lakes, FLX, History, photography, Upstate New York

Pictures of Upstate New York. October. Buck Settlement cemetery

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Halloween, photography

an incantation by moonlight

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Yesterday we walked by plantations of white pines and spruce,  remnants of old apple orchards, lovely red sugar maples, beeches, hornbeams, and hophornbeams.

Those last two trees are pictured above.

Of the two, I prefer the hophornbeam.

I mean, who wants a hornbeam that just sits there?

I find it’s true that Nature abhors a vacuum – –

ambling along,  pretty much totally vacant of thought,

empty-headed,

so Nature provided a little wake-up call – –

two ruffed grouse, alway wiseguys, suddenly shot up,

like whirring rockets.

I’ve never gotten a picture of a grouse,

just a few minor heart attacks,

when they suddenly blast off,

three feet in front of my face.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’d gone into a stretch of hemlocks, where it’s always a bit darker,

and getting along toward sundown,

so we’d decided to head back, while we could still see the trail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

But first we walked just a bit down the hill,

to listen to the creek,

and look at the tiny waterfalls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And found a shrine-like assemblage of pebbles on the bank.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little heart-shaped stones were tucked every which way into crevices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know, damn hippies.

This won’t gladden the hearts of most hikers I know,

who are fundamentally opposed to leaving any alteration or trace of human activity in the woods.

And humans being humans, they kinda overdid things,

maybe just a tad,

so it ended up looking like a Neolithic dump,

just after Valentine’s Day in the Stone Age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

But there were no beer cans, cigarette butts, or shell casings,

and to be honest,

I kind of got a kick out of this particular little display of weirdness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why am I always thinking about food? I saw these lovely ferns, and all I could think was, how come there’s never a good salad bar in the woods, when you need one.  With those little croutons.

 

Autumn, Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, Ithaca, NY, photography, Public Art, Uncategorized, United States, Upstate New York

Pictures of Upstate New York. October. Corazón de piedra

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