Johnny Reb & Billy Yank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War, Decoration Day, First World War, History, Memorial Day, Waterloo, WWI

Memorial Day Postcards VII ~ ~ 1900 – 1945 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ” There in the fragrant pines and the cedars dusk and dim”

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A very busy photograph, but that seems appropriate for Teddy Roosevelt. The real Teddy did visit Waterloo, but by train, on a whistle-stop campaign for Governor.

 

 

 

This small village lost fifty-eight men during the Civil War.

 

 

 

The actual observance of Memorial Day, and commemoration of the fallen, will be on the 30th, as it has been, every year, for 151 years.

 

 

 

I took a picture of an old Chrysler, and didn’t see the reflection of the flags until I got home. This is similar to the one owned by Harry Truman, who would drive with his wife Bess to NYC, to visit their daughter.  He drove it himself, with no Secret Service detail.

 

courtesy of the Truman Library, accession Number: 2004-213

 

This reminded me of the 1975 song by Robert Lamm of the band “Chicago,” who was not a fan of Richard Nixon –

Harry Truman

America needs you Harry Truman ~ Harry could you please come home

Things are looking bad ~ I know you would be mad ~

To see what kind of men ~ Prevail upon the land you love ~

America’s wondering, how we got here ~ Harry all we get is lies~

We’re gettin’ safer cars ~ Rocket ships to Mars ~

From men who’d sell us out~  To get themselves a piece of power ~ 

We’d love to hear you speak your mind ~ In plain and simple ways ~

Call a spade a spade~  Like you did back in the day ~

You would play piano ~ Each morning walk a mile ~

Speak of what was going down ~ With honesty and style ~

~ America’s calling Harry Truman ~ Harry you know what to do ~

The world is turnin’ round ~ and losin’ lots of ground

Oh Harry is there something we can do to save the land we love ~~~~~ by Robert Lamm

 

Civil War, Decoration Day, Finger Lakes, FLX, History, Memorial Day, Upstate New York, Waterloo

151st Memorial Day Parade, Waterloo, NY.

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WPA poster from the 1930’s

 

c. 1900-1910

 

Rushville, NY

 

1908

 

Antietam

 

 

Monument to the Irish Brigade at Bloody Lane

 

Civil War, Decoration Day, Memorial Day, Waterloo

Memorial Day Postcards & Pictures VI

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The “Flags on Parade” stamp was first issued on May 30, 1991 in Waterloo, NY, for the 125th anniversary of the village’s Memorial Day observances.

 

1908

 

c. 1900-1910

 

 

1908

 

1908  Grand Army of the Republic. Membership in the G.A.R. peaked at 490,000 in 1890. Their last “encampment” was held in Indianapolis in 1949, and it’s last member died seven years later.

 

1908

 

 

 

Decoration Day, History, Memorial Day, Uncategorized, Waterloo

Memorial Day Postcards V ~ ~ ~ 1900 – 1910 ~ ~ ~ Old Glory

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c. 1917-1918.   Even after Veteran’s Day (originally called Armistice Day) was instituted in 1919, Memorial Day has continued to be an opportunity to honor not only those lost in the wars, but also the surviving veterans, and those currently serving in the military.

 

 

c. 1900-1910 Some historians estimate that 70,000 soldiers lost a limb during the Civil War. It has often been noted, that in 1866, the state of Mississippi spent more that half it’s annual budget on artificial limbs.

 

One of the philanthropists supporting this writing contest for one-armed veterans, Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. (Teddy’s father), had also supported the war effort, but did not serve in the army. Instead, he avoided the draft by hiring a substitute to take his place in the ranks.  LOC

 

LOC

 

I just read that Hanger, Inc., a company providing prosthetic limbs, was founded by a one-legged Confederate veteran. J. E. Hanger enlisted at 18, and two days later, was hit by a cannonball. He may have had the honor of becoming the first known amputee of the Civil War. An engineering student, he developed a lighter, superior wooden leg made from barrel staves, and supplied them to the Confederate Army. He lived long enough to see his inventions used by another generation of soldiers, wounded in the First World War.

 

James Edward Hanger, from his company’s website

 

c. 1900 – 1914

 

When I looked at this particular portrait, I wondered if he survived the war.

 

1883 Reunion of Union veterans. LOC

 

LOC

 

“A Grateful Land Remembers All Her Promises Today”

 

 

Civil War, Decoration Day, History, Memorial Day, Waterloo

Memorial Day Postcards II ~ ~ ~ 1900 – 1918 ~ ~ ~ Veterans

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Over the next few days, I’ll be posting some pre-WWI postcards from Memorial Day, which used to be called Decoration Day in some parts of the country. My hometown, Waterloo, NY, was the first in the country to begin an official, community-wide, non-sectarian observance of Memorial Day, starting in 1866. Two years later, General John “Black Jack” Logan, head of the largest organization of Union veterans, the G.A.R., began observances at Arlington National Cemetery. After World War I, when it became a day to remember the dead from all our wars, most southern states began participating. The cards were at first sentimental portrayals of old vets, children and widows remembering the fallen, then later scenes of reconciliation, and over time, sometimes show the day becoming a less solemn, springtime holiday, until the losses of the First World War.

 

 

Tuck's 1900-1910

 

This one isn’t a postcard, but rather a c. 1893 pictorial premium from a coffee company. A bit clumsy – the artist probably didn’t intend to make it look like a geriatric quoits tournament.

 

Tuck's 1900-1910

 

1912.

 

 

 

Memorial Day cover of the 1894 “Youth’s Companion”

Civil War, Decoration Day, History, Memorial Day, NY, Uncategorized, Waterloo

Memorial Day Postcards I ~ ~ ~ 1893 – 1912 ~ ~ ~ Remembrance, Reconciliation, Floral Tributes

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Sumac

Not really presenting this post as a Fabulous Fall Foliage Photo Folio

(please, say those last five words three times fast)

more as an advertisement for a neglected part of autumn.

Sumac is often scrubby and undistinguished, and every fall, I realized that it’s rarely mentioned,

when people are exclaiming over the maples and aspens and oaks.

Kind of a mutt – – too leggy and sprawling to be used as a shrub in your yard, but seems too small to be a real “tree.”

It usually grows like a big clump of weeds – –

in neglected corners of fields, along roadways and railroad beds, or behind barns.

 

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I read up on it a bit, and find that in other countries, the dried “fruit” is used as a lemony spice.

I’ve never heard of anyone using the North American version in this way.

But I’ve been informed, that I’ve eaten it, and liked it:  it’s a key ingredient in  Middle Eastern “za’atar” seasoning

(there’s a lot of versions, but thyme, sesame seed, and dried sumac seem to be the constants).

Just try saying “Za’atar!  Sumac!  Sesame!”  out loud,

and see if it doesn’t sound pretty cool and exotic.

 

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The only use I can think of for its wood:  kids cut it into foot-long sections, push out the pithy center, and use it for pea-shooters.

I’ve also read that Native Americans used the sections as pipe-stems, but I don’t know if this is true.

The Iroquois tribes around this area, grew beans, corn, and squash, but not peas, so I guess the pea-shooter idea was of no use to them, and they had to stick with tomahawks and arrows.

(Actually, we generally used the the smallest fruits from hawthorns, or inkberries, not actual peas, depending on the caliber of the shrub we’d cut that day).  But there are two other attributes that make this little-noticed, unkempt little tree kind of special.

 

 

For kids in this part of the world, the little groves of sumac were the closest thing we’d experience to a bamboo thicket.  Only kids could eel their way through the dense stands of sumac, like Br’er Rabbit escaping a fox.  Say, hypothetically, if you used your pea-shooter to ambush a larger cousin walking by.

 

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And every fall, having gone the entire summer in scruffy obscurity, it faithfully turns beautiful reds, yellows, and oranges.

Always, without fail.

Having gone the entire summer in generic, innocuous obscurity, just as autumn begins, it flames out with style.

 

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The leaves hang in festive rows, like tiny ceremonial banners for the autumn celebration,

a mousey shrub suddenly looking quite elegant.

Sumacs are like the quiet, unassuming, small-town guys, that you always forget are Shriners, until one day, out of the blue, they break out their red velvet fezzes, have a few belts, and parade down the avenue in their crazy bright brocade uniforms.

 

I don’t use the expression, but sumac seems to meet the definition of a “hot mess” – – disheveled but attractive.

 

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Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, Ithaca, NY, Uncategorized, Upstate New York, Waterloo

Pictures of Upstate New York in October. Staghorn Sumac

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