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This is not a particularly colorful shot, but I just like this stretch of the creek,

I guess in part, because this is the farthest upstream I’ve been.

So your imagination can create whatever it wants, past that bend.

(Pretty sure it’s just cow pastures, but still…when the picture was taken, I didn’t anticipate posting it from South America, so who knows what’s up around the bend.)

“It’s easy to go around the bend, but hard to see around the corner.”

 

 

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Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, Ithaca, Upstate New York

Walks Around The Finger Lakes. November. Fall Creek.

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An old railway bed near Canandaigua, NY.

1870's, Autumn, Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, Nature, NY, Railroads, trains, Upstate New York

Walks Around The Finger Lakes. Early November, Late Afternoon.

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Sumac

Not really presenting this post as a Fabulous Fall Foliage Photo Folio

(please, say those last five words three times fast)

more as an advertisement for a neglected part of autumn.

Sumac is often scrubby and undistinguished, and every fall, I realized that it’s rarely mentioned,

when people are exclaiming over the maples and aspens and oaks.

Kind of a mutt – – too leggy and sprawling to be used as a shrub in your yard, but seems too small to be a real “tree.”

It usually grows like a big clump of weeds – –

in neglected corners of fields, along roadways and railroad beds, or behind barns.

 

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I read up on it a bit, and find that in other countries, the dried “fruit” is used as a lemony spice.

I’ve never heard of anyone using the North American version in this way.

But I’ve been informed, that I’ve eaten it, and liked it:  it’s a key ingredient in  Middle Eastern “za’atar” seasoning

(there’s a lot of versions, but thyme, sesame seed, and dried sumac seem to be the constants).

Just try saying “Za’atar!  Sumac!  Sesame!”  out loud,

and see if it doesn’t sound pretty cool and exotic.

 

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The only use I can think of for its wood:  kids cut it into foot-long sections, push out the pithy center, and use it for pea-shooters.

I’ve also read that Native Americans used the sections as pipe-stems, but I don’t know if this is true.

The Iroquois tribes around this area, grew beans, corn, and squash, but not peas, so I guess the pea-shooter idea was of no use to them, and they had to stick with tomahawks and arrows.

(Actually, we generally used the the smallest fruits from hawthorns, or inkberries, not actual peas, depending on the caliber of the shrub we’d cut that day).  But there are two other attributes that make this little-noticed, unkempt little tree kind of special.

 

 

For kids in this part of the world, the little groves of sumac were the closest thing we’d experience to a bamboo thicket.  Only kids could eel their way through the dense stands of sumac, like Br’er Rabbit escaping a fox.  Say, hypothetically, if you used your pea-shooter to ambush a larger cousin walking by.

 

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And every fall, having gone the entire summer in scruffy obscurity, it faithfully turns beautiful reds, yellows, and oranges.

Always, without fail.

Having gone the entire summer in generic, innocuous obscurity, just as autumn begins, it flames out with style.

 

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The leaves hang in festive rows, like tiny ceremonial banners for the autumn celebration,

a mousey shrub suddenly looking quite elegant.

Sumacs are like the quiet, unassuming, small-town guys, that you always forget are Shriners, until one day, out of the blue, they break out their red velvet fezzes, have a few belts, and parade down the avenue in their crazy bright brocade uniforms.

 

I don’t use the expression, but sumac seems to meet the definition of a “hot mess” – – disheveled but attractive.

 

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Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, Ithaca, NY, Uncategorized, Upstate New York, Waterloo

Walks Around The Finger Lakes. October. Staghorn Sumac

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Finger Lakes, FLX, Upstate New York

Walks Around The Finger Lakes. October. B & W Fall leaves.

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I don’t pretend to know anything about photography.  I just like taking photos.

Every day I see things that are beautiful, interesting, odd, or just pleasing to the eye, and a photograph lets me enjoy it again, and share it with other people.  I’m working on learning more about photography, but have a long, long way to go.  It’s pretty addictive!

A friend of mine tells me that most photographers really hate the “focal B&W” thing, like leaving a single red leaf in a B&W shot.

It probably can get annoying very quickly, but I’m kind of having fun with it.  #phillistine

For me, one of the best things about exploring WordPress, has been connecting to some really outstanding photo blogs, which has in turn inspired me to start learning more about photography, cameras, and photo-editing.

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At the end, looking slimy and a bit the worse for wear,

the Great Puffball addresses his followers for the last time.

 

Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, NY, Uncategorized, Upstate New York

Walks Around The Finger Lakes. October. A Fungus Among Us.

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Flint Creek.

Just a few miles from where I grew up.

The bridge is called Stanley.

There isn’t a spectacular view.

“The Great Stanley Bridge” is really just a former railroad trestle.

It is hard to romanticize a place, when you know that on the other side of the trees, are just muddy fields full of cabbages.

But it’s a nice, peaceful spot, away from any roads, accessible only by a walking path, down an old railway bed.

These little country railways, laid down in the 1850’s – 1870’s,  didn’t have high embankments, and sometimes run through cuts, so you’re often walking a bit below the level of the fields, like those sunken lanes in England, they call holloways.

The trees and shrubs along it make a green tunnel, that’s pretty shady and pleasant on hot days, and out of the wind on cold days.

 

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Same scene, a week later, and a bit later in the day

 

 

 

1850's, 1870's, Finger Lakes, FLX, hiking, NY, photography, Railroads, trains, Upstate New York

Walks Around The Finger Lakes. October. Flint Creek

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